November 14, 2018
 
Save the Harbor, Peabody-Essex Museum Leaders to Retire

October 14, 2018 — Two nonprofits, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay in Boston and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, last week announced their chief executives will retire after leading their organizations for 18 years and 25 years, respectively.

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, which works to restore and protect Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay, and the marine environment for public use, said President and Chief Executive Officer Patty Foley will step down from her role at the end of 2018. Foley has led the organization since 2000.

A consulting firm has been retained to advise and conduct the search for Foley's replacement.

During her tenure Foley increased membership from 500 to more than 5,000, grown the organization’s annual budget from $150,000 to more than $1 million and expanded Save the Harbor’s free youth environmental education programs that have connected nearly 250,000 underserved youth and teens to Boston Harbor since their inception in 2002.

“Patty Foley is one of Boston’s great treasures. Her unique leadership skills and political instincts have ensured that we protect and preserve one of our most valuable urban natural resources and put them to work as assets for the region’s residents and communities,“ said Joseph Newman, board chair of Save the Harbor. “The board and I look forward to celebrating Patty’s legacy of accomplishments over the coming months and continuing the work we are already doing to plan for the next chapter of the Boston Harbor Success Story.”

“I love Boston and our spectacular harbor,” said Foley. “I have truly enjoyed this opportunity to work with so many terrific people, including policy makers, civic and community leaders, and the region’s businesses and foundations to achieve our shared mission and goals. You can be certain that I will continue to do all I can to ensure that Save the Harbor is well prepared to continue to be an important civic asset for the residents of every neighborhood in the City of Boston and the region’s residents as well.”

Peabody Essex Museum ED to Retire after 25 Years

Dan Monroe, executive director and CEO of the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) for 25 years, announced he will retire next September following the summer opening of PEM’s major new wing.

Robert N. Shapiro, PEM board president, cited Monroe as "a widely-recognized pathbreaker and leader in creating an entirely new kind of art museum."

“Just like PEM’s global entrepreneurial founders in 1799, Dan set out to create an experience that connects art, culture and creative expression from around the world in exciting and unexpected ways,” said Shapiro. “He has poured his heart, passion and talent into transforming PEM into the international force that it is today. Dan is a remarkable thinker, leader and builder. PEM plays a major leadership role because of his work, imagination and drive.”

PEM said that during his tenure Monroe led the consolidation of two museums into a museum that operates on a global stage and stands among the top 10% of American and Canadian art museums as measured by size of budget, facilities, and other metrics.

Monroe spearheaded two major capital campaign and expansion programs — raising more than $800 million and adding more than 270,000-square-feet of new facilities and renovating or restoring tens of thousands of square feet of existing facilities.

Monroe, among other accomplishments, also increased the operating budget from $3 million to $33 million; oversaw an increase in the endowment from $23 million to more than $500 million; increased annual on-site attendance from 60,000 to more than 270,000; acquired through purchase and donation of art to collections valued at more than $100 million; and created innovative methods of presenting and interpreting art, including the application of neuroscience to the design of art experiences.

© 2018 www.massnonprofit.org. All rights reserved.
Home  News  Features  Expert Advice  Resources  Jobs  Services Directory  Advertising  About  Privacy Policy  Contact